Articles

The One Church, the Many Churches: A Catholic Approach to Ecclesial Unity and Diversity—with Special Attention to Abraham Kuyper’s Ecclesiastical Epistemology by Eduardo Echeverria
Articles , Theology / January 27, 2021

The One Church, the Many Churches: A Catholic Approach to Ecclesial Unity and Diversity—with Special Attention to Abraham Kuyper’s Ecclesiastical Epistemology Eduardo Echeverria Professor of Philosophy and Systematic Theology, Graduate School of Theology, Sacred Heart Major Seminary Share this on: FacebookTwitterLinkedin

An Introduction to Catholicity: An Editorial Preface to this Special Issue by Ryan A. Brandt and Matthew Y. Emerson
Articles , Theology / January 26, 2021

An Introduction to Catholicity: An Editorial Preface to this Special Issue By Ryan A. Brandt and Matthew Y. Emerson Ryan Brandt is Associate Professor of Christian History and Theology at Grand Canyon University and Managing Editor of JBTS; Matt Emerson is Professor of Religion, Floyd K. Clark Chair of Leadership, and Dean of the Hobbs College of Theology & Ministry at Oklahoma Baptist University. While it has a long and distinguished history in the Christian tradition, the word “catholicity” has become a buzzword of sorts in these last few decades. Across some denominational lines, it elicits polarizing responses that lead to neglecting or even dismissing it. Yet, in recent decades there has been a revival of interest on the topic, a growing awareness that catholicity is an essential part of Christianity, including at least most of the major denominational heritages. This volume was inspired by the renewed Protestant emphasis of catholicity in the contemporary landscape. Given the broadness of the term as well as the varied application across different denominational lines, it seemed helpful and timely to offer a survey of various approaches. Such approaches show real differences among Christians, but they also show encouraging signs that Christians are reappropriating…

JBTS 5.1 Conclusion: Ephesians and the Powers by Joshua M. Greever
Articles , New Testament / May 12, 2020

Conclusion: Ephesians and the Powers Joshua M. Greever Joshua M. Greever (Ph.D.) is Assistant Professor of New Testament at Grand Canyon University and Grand Canyon Theological Seminary in Phoenix, AZ There is little doubt that Paul’s letter to the Ephesians holds a central place in our biblical understanding of the Powers. With this in mind, in this volume we tried to analyze closely the presentation of the Powers in Ephesians, and to use our analysis of the Powers as a window into exploring some of Paul’s other major themes in the letter. Specifically, analyzing the Powers in Ephesians contributed to our understanding of the letter’s theology, soteriology, ecclesiology, discipleship, and missions. Share this on: FacebookTwitterLinkedin

Bonhoeffer and the Way of the Crucified: Methodeia, Doctrine, and the ‘Powers’ by Jonathan K. Sharpe and Jerry Pillay

Bonhoeffer and the Way of the Crucified: Methodeia, Doctrine, and the ‘Powers’ Jonathan K. Sharpe and Jerry Pillay Jonathan K. Sharpe (Ph.D., University of Pretoria) is Assistant Professor of Theology at Grand Canyon University in Phoenix, AZ; Jerry Pillay (Ph.D.) is Dean of the Faculty of Theology and Religion at the University of Pretoria in South Africa Abstract: The Greek word methodeia, the “schemes,” “tricks,” or “methods” of the enemy that move us away from Christ and from unity in his body, is uniquely found only within Ephesians 4:14 and 6:11. In Ephesians 4:14, Paul focuses on the unity of the body of Christ and the way Christians grow into unity and maturity with Christ is by avoiding the methodeia of the enemy. The term also appears again in Ephesians 6:11 where Paul urges believers to put on the armor of God to avoid the methodeia of the devil. In this chapter we consider Peter Rollins’ theological movement of “Radical Theology” as being an example of methodeia which might disrupt the transformational unity of the body of Christ and against which we need to arm ourselves. We especially examine the purported reliance of Rollins’ movement upon the work of Dietrich…

Reading Ephesians in Dialogue with the Powers in Colossians by Vicky Balabanski
Articles , New Testament / May 12, 2020

Reading Ephesians in Dialogue with the Powers in Colossians Vicky Balabanski Vicky Balabanski (Ph.D, University of Melbourne) Rev. Dr. Vicky Balabanski is senior lecturer in New Testament at Flinders University Department of Theology and Director of Biblical Studies at the Uniting College for Leadership and Theology Abstract: This chapter focuses on interpreting the powers in Colossians, a letter with close connections with the Letter to the Ephesians. It begins with three contemporary scenarios where the perception of the powers among indigenous Christians is contrasted with that of non-indigenous Christians. This demonstrates that any discussion of the powers is conducted in a culturally and theologically contested space. From the perspective of the positive reference to the powers in Colossians 1:16, it examines the more negative references in Colossians 1:13 and 2:15. It sets all these references against the background of Hellenistic cosmology, including the depiction of the powers in Plato’s Allegory of the Cave, 1 Enoch 64:1–2, and Jude 14-15. The reference to angelic worship in Colossians 2:18 is also discussed. The chapter concludes by comparing the portrayal of the powers in Colossians and Ephesians, arguing that Western Christianity is right to emphasize the victory of Christ over all powers, but…

Considering the Impact of Missiology on Contemporary Understandings of “Principalities and Powers” by Simon Gomersall
Articles , New Testament / May 12, 2020

Considering the Impact of Missiology on Contemporary Understandings of “Principalities and Powers” Simon Gomersall Simon Gomersall is Lecturer in Historical and Contemporary Mission at Trinity College Queensland in Brisbane, Australia Abstract: While the early 20th century saw well-defined movement toward the depersonalizing and demythologizing of principalities and powers as they are described in the biblical text, the latter part of the century witnessed a reappraisal of this process as multi-cultural perspectives began to filter from the mission field into the academy. This paper traces key milestones in the former demythologizing process and then explores some of the reasons why these modernist assumptions have been revised, including: the experiences of missionaries, greater insight into the assumptions that lie behind worldviews, and the research of anthropologists. The paper finishes with the brief suggestion that each part of this journey brings value to the practice of Christian ministry. Key Words: powers, missions, missiology, demythologizing, worldview, syncretism, secularization, Christian worldview, global south, multi-cultural mission Share this on: FacebookTwitterLinkedin

The Armor of God, the Gospel of Christ, and Standing Firm against the ‘Powers’ (Ephesians 6:10–20) by Joshua M. Greever
Articles , New Testament / May 12, 2020

The Armor of God, the Gospel of Christ, and Standing Firm against the ‘Powers’ (Ephesians 6:10–20) Joshua M. Greever Joshua M. Greever (Ph.D.) is Assistant Professor of New Testament at Grand Canyon University and Grand Canyon Theological Seminary in Phoenix, AZ Abstract: As the climactic conclusion to the letter, Ephesians 6:10–20 recapitulates and summarizes much of the earlier themes in Ephesians. It clarifies that the “powers” are evil, supernaturally power, spiritual beings. Christians must therefore stand firm against the “powers” by resting in Christ’s redemptive work for them. Christ is seen as the Divine Warrior whose victory over the “powers” is the armor that Christians are called to put on and appropriate by virtue of their union with Christ by faith. Key Words: powers, Divine Warrior, union with Christ, stand firm, armor of God Share this on: FacebookTwitterLinkedin